India

GIFs: Indian Drought Now and Flood 10 Years Ago

India is too hot, literally. This, again, comes from NASA Earth Observatory:

Monsoon rains began arriving across India in early June 2016. For many Indians, it was not a moment too soon. After three underwhelming monsoon seasons, broad swaths of the country have been gripped by drought. An estimated 330 million people have been affected by depleted water supplies.

Of all of India’s reservoirs, Panchet Hill in Jharkhand was among the lowest compared to the 10-year average. In the first week of June 2016, the reservoir stood at 4 percent of capacity; the average for June is 40 percent.

Of all of India’s reservoirs, Panchet Hill in Jharkhand was among the lowest compared to the 10-year average. In the first week of June 2016, the reservoir stood at 4 percent of capacity; the average for June is 40 percent. These two images were taken on June 10, 2015 and June 12, 2016

This is what it looks like at night on June 17, 2016, with much of India hotter than China’s biggest dessert in Xinjiang.

Some parts of India were as hot as 45 degrees Celcius in the evening of June 17, 2016, via earth.nullschool.net

Some parts of India were as hot as 45 degrees Celcius in the evening of June 17, 2016, via earth.nullschool.net

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Forbes Writing Pieces

Michael Photo, Video January 1, 2012 Leave a reply

Brewer and his graduate students at Berkeley have concocted a wireless networking scheme called Wildnet (Wild is short for “Wi-Fi over long distance”). Two Wildnet transmitters can shuttle 5 million bits per second, as much as a cable modem, over distances of up to 60 miles. A relay station is needed if the antennas aren’t in direct line of sight. Wildnet takes Wi-Fi technology and extends its range 100 times farther than an airport hot spot.

UC Berkeley Professor Eric Brewer is a leading developer of a long-distance Wi-Fi that aspired to provide affordable access to telemedicine in rural India, and beyond. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.

UC Berkeley Professor Eric Brewer is a leading developer of a long-distance Wi-Fi that aspired to provide affordable access to telemedicine in rural India, and beyond. Click/Tap to read on Forbes


 

A Beijing upstart is betting it can transform China’s subways with commercials that play on tunnel walls as trains barrel past.

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Topflash CEO Cao Bin rides a subway car while his LED ads flashed on the wall outside the subway. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.com


 

Want to own a Gustav Klimt? You may not have been bidding on the Austrian master’s “Adele Bloch-Bauer I,” which went to Manhattan’s Neue Galerie museum in June for $135 million. However, you can get a reduced-size reproduction for $109 by clicking on OilPaintingsGallery.com or for $189 at Oceansbridge.com.

A village in China specializes in mass producing copycat masterpiece paintings for middle-class customers in the West. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.com

A village in China specializes in mass producing copycat masterpiece paintings for middle-class customers in the West. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.com


 

A variety of other animal-oriented occupations have popped up in China of late, including trainers, stylists, mental therapists and crematoriums. Pet clothes, which are not uncommon, are often more expensive than name-brand T shirts. And a styling runs anywhere from $10 to $80. The overall pet economy, with an estimated value of $2 billion, is projected to be worth $5 billion by 2010.

China's booming economy has also given rise to a new pet-serving industry worth billions of dollars. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.com

China’s booming economy has also given rise to a new pet-serving industry worth billions of dollars. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.com


 

The notional value of reward points, half based on cell phone usage, is at least an annual $640 million, growing 10% to 20% a year.

China is new to this hunt. The U.S. has a well-established sector of so-called performance-improvement companies, some of which are 100 years old. They manage loyalty programs, employee-recognition awards and the like for corporate clients or provide software and support for these. Such fare–airline mileage points long being the currency of choice in the U.S.–are a $30-billion-a-year industry.

China is catching up on the reward program-based economy, which in a market like the U.S. is worth $30 billion a year. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.com

China is catching up on the reward program-based economy, which in a market like the U.S. is worth $30 billion a year. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.com

 

Doc Film “Himalayan Meltdown” on Discovery Asia

Michael Film, Video May 1, 2011 Leave a reply

Glaciers in Asia are creating an uncertain future across the region. From Nepal to the Tibetan Plateau, Bhutan to India and the Bay of Bengal, a way of life is under threat. The climate is changing and life as we know it from the mountains to sea is falling out of balance. These glaciers are source to seven of the region’s greatest rivers. But our most precious resource is disappearing one drop at a time. The people of Asia are answering the call, harnessing determination, spirituality and science to adapt and survive in a face of a Himalayan Meltdown.

I contributed research and camera work to the documentary from Qinghai and Tibet in China. Here below is a trailer:

Revealed: Himalayan Meltdown, a co-production by the UN Development Programme, Discovery Asia, and Arrowhead Films aired on Discovery Channel, Sunday 15 May 2011, 21:00 hrs.
Airdates:
Sun. 15 May 11, 21:00 – Discovery SE Asia
Sun. 15 May 11, 21:00 – Discovery Malaysia
Sun. 15 May 11, 21:00 – Discovery Philippines
Sun. 29 May 11, 19:30 – Discovery Australia
Sun. 29 May 11, 19:30 – Discovery New Zealand
Sun. 05 June 11, 21:00 – Discovery Taiwan