Forbes

Screenings: China Green Docs Film Series

Michael Film, Video September 1, 2014

The environmental cost of China’s breakneck development can be witnessed across the smoggy skylines of its megacities. But not all of China’s environmental problems are so visually apparent, from soils contaminated by cadmium and arsenic, to diminishing groundwater supplies unfit for drinking. The films in this series of Chinese environmental documentaries make visible some of the hidden consequences of China’s rapid growth and the people fighting to save their communities and livelihoods.

The series of film events were featured in the New York Times and received sold out crowds for all the nights. It has been one of the best attended film series at Asia Society. Here below is the trailer for the series:

Film: Waking the Green Tiger, 78 min, 2011, Canada/China, Dir. Gary Marcuse

Discussion: Plastic China with Wang Jiuliang

Film: Yak Dung, 50 min., Dir. Lanze

Film: Last Moose at Aoluguya, 100 min., Dr. Gu Tao

The New York Times: ‘Waking the Green Tiger: Documentaries From the Front Lines of China’s Environmental Crisis’

Forbes: Asia Society Has Opened Window on China’s Environment

Last month the Asia Society began a film series with Waking the Green Tiger, a documentary about efforts to forestall the flooding of villages in pursuit of a dam at Yunnan province’s Tiger Leaping Gorge. I met Chinese producer Shi Lihong, who was in New York for the event.

 

Forbes Writing Pieces

Michael Photo, Video January 1, 2012

Brewer and his graduate students at Berkeley have concocted a wireless networking scheme called Wildnet (Wild is short for “Wi-Fi over long distance”). Two Wildnet transmitters can shuttle 5 million bits per second, as much as a cable modem, over distances of up to 60 miles. A relay station is needed if the antennas aren’t in direct line of sight. Wildnet takes Wi-Fi technology and extends its range 100 times farther than an airport hot spot.

UC Berkeley Professor Eric Brewer is a leading developer of a long-distance Wi-Fi that aspired to provide affordable access to telemedicine in rural India, and beyond. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.

UC Berkeley Professor Eric Brewer is a leading developer of a long-distance Wi-Fi that aspired to provide affordable access to telemedicine in rural India, and beyond. Click/Tap to read on Forbes


 

A Beijing upstart is betting it can transform China’s subways with commercials that play on tunnel walls as trains barrel past.

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Topflash CEO Cao Bin rides a subway car while his LED ads flashed on the wall outside the subway. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.com


 

Want to own a Gustav Klimt? You may not have been bidding on the Austrian master’s “Adele Bloch-Bauer I,” which went to Manhattan’s Neue Galerie museum in June for $135 million. However, you can get a reduced-size reproduction for $109 by clicking on OilPaintingsGallery.com or for $189 at Oceansbridge.com.

A village in China specializes in mass producing copycat masterpiece paintings for middle-class customers in the West. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.com

A village in China specializes in mass producing copycat masterpiece paintings for middle-class customers in the West. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.com


 

A variety of other animal-oriented occupations have popped up in China of late, including trainers, stylists, mental therapists and crematoriums. Pet clothes, which are not uncommon, are often more expensive than name-brand T shirts. And a styling runs anywhere from $10 to $80. The overall pet economy, with an estimated value of $2 billion, is projected to be worth $5 billion by 2010.

China's booming economy has also given rise to a new pet-serving industry worth billions of dollars. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.com

China’s booming economy has also given rise to a new pet-serving industry worth billions of dollars. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.com


 

The notional value of reward points, half based on cell phone usage, is at least an annual $640 million, growing 10% to 20% a year.

China is new to this hunt. The U.S. has a well-established sector of so-called performance-improvement companies, some of which are 100 years old. They manage loyalty programs, employee-recognition awards and the like for corporate clients or provide software and support for these. Such fare–airline mileage points long being the currency of choice in the U.S.–are a $30-billion-a-year industry.

China is catching up on the reward program-based economy, which in a market like the U.S. is worth $30 billion a year. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.com

China is catching up on the reward program-based economy, which in a market like the U.S. is worth $30 billion a year. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.com