Asia Society

Climate Central: Sea Level Rise Visualized

Michael Interactive, Photo, Video January 23, 2016

Here’s what I write in a recent post on ChinaFile about sea level rise in interactive imagery and maps by Climate Central:

I think a big part of the reason why citizens of the world have not rallied to deal with climate change is the lack of a certain deadline that would warrant our immediate response to the grave consequences of our warming planet. There is no discussion of a specific hurricane or other specific imminent event. As a species we are very good at procrastinating. But Climate Central has published a series of shocking graphics that show the danger of rising sea levels faced by Shanghai, Hong Kong, London, New York, and many other cities.

Here are all the amazing slider images by Climate Central showing how much sea level rises 2C and 4C temperature rises will lock in in the coming centuries, enjoy sliding and playing:

Now here below is one map called “Surging Seas: Mapping Choices” also done by Climate Central. Zoom in and out, drag the map, and many other things to compare the two temperature rise scenarios and what they will do to sea levels and the city streets, in this case Greater New York City area:

Actually, in all the slider interactive images above, you can click/tap the link below each image to see the comparative interactive maps for that location.


 

Now I’d like to give a big shout out to the visual artist Nickolay Lamm who did the interactive city street images. And his big hit project of late is Lammily, or what a Barbie Doll should really look like in a normal woman:

Here below is what real 2nd-graders in a school in Pittsburgh, PA thinks about Lammily, the normal Barbie doll:

Data: U.S.-Asia-China CO2 Historial Emissions

Michael Data & Graphics, Photo January 1, 2016

Asia Society is turning 60 years old this year and one way of commemorating the anniversary is marking a historic milestone in Asia’s rise and, along with it, a major contribution to the world’s explosive growth of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

If Asia were a country, it would have become the biggest emitter of CO2 in historical terms, just surpassing the United States around this year. Below is a chart with the orange area representing Asia, and the Leogryph icon is borrowed from Asia Society’s logo:

pic_US-Asia-China historical CO2 1955-2015e copy copy

Screenings: China Green Docs Film Series

Michael Film, Video September 1, 2014

The environmental cost of China’s breakneck development can be witnessed across the smoggy skylines of its megacities. But not all of China’s environmental problems are so visually apparent, from soils contaminated by cadmium and arsenic, to diminishing groundwater supplies unfit for drinking. The films in this series of Chinese environmental documentaries make visible some of the hidden consequences of China’s rapid growth and the people fighting to save their communities and livelihoods.

The series of film events were featured in the New York Times and received sold out crowds for all the nights. It has been one of the best attended film series at Asia Society. Here below is the trailer for the series:

Film: Waking the Green Tiger, 78 min, 2011, Canada/China, Dir. Gary Marcuse

Discussion: Plastic China with Wang Jiuliang

Film: Yak Dung, 50 min., Dir. Lanze

Film: Last Moose at Aoluguya, 100 min., Dr. Gu Tao

The New York Times: ‘Waking the Green Tiger: Documentaries From the Front Lines of China’s Environmental Crisis’

Forbes: Asia Society Has Opened Window on China’s Environment

Last month the Asia Society began a film series with Waking the Green Tiger, a documentary about efforts to forestall the flooding of villages in pursuit of a dam at Yunnan province’s Tiger Leaping Gorge. I met Chinese producer Shi Lihong, who was in New York for the event.