Forbes Writing Pieces

Michael Photo, Video January 1, 2012 Leave a reply

Brewer and his graduate students at Berkeley have concocted a wireless networking scheme called Wildnet (Wild is short for “Wi-Fi over long distance”). Two Wildnet transmitters can shuttle 5 million bits per second, as much as a cable modem, over distances of up to 60 miles. A relay station is needed if the antennas aren’t in direct line of sight. Wildnet takes Wi-Fi technology and extends its range 100 times farther than an airport hot spot.

UC Berkeley Professor Eric Brewer is a leading developer of a long-distance Wi-Fi that aspired to provide affordable access to telemedicine in rural India, and beyond. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.

UC Berkeley Professor Eric Brewer is a leading developer of a long-distance Wi-Fi that aspired to provide affordable access to telemedicine in rural India, and beyond. Click/Tap to read on Forbes


 

A Beijing upstart is betting it can transform China’s subways with commercials that play on tunnel walls as trains barrel past.

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Topflash CEO Cao Bin rides a subway car while his LED ads flashed on the wall outside the subway. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.com


 

Want to own a Gustav Klimt? You may not have been bidding on the Austrian master’s “Adele Bloch-Bauer I,” which went to Manhattan’s Neue Galerie museum in June for $135 million. However, you can get a reduced-size reproduction for $109 by clicking on OilPaintingsGallery.com or for $189 at Oceansbridge.com.

A village in China specializes in mass producing copycat masterpiece paintings for middle-class customers in the West. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.com

A village in China specializes in mass producing copycat masterpiece paintings for middle-class customers in the West. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.com


 

A variety of other animal-oriented occupations have popped up in China of late, including trainers, stylists, mental therapists and crematoriums. Pet clothes, which are not uncommon, are often more expensive than name-brand T shirts. And a styling runs anywhere from $10 to $80. The overall pet economy, with an estimated value of $2 billion, is projected to be worth $5 billion by 2010.

China's booming economy has also given rise to a new pet-serving industry worth billions of dollars. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.com

China’s booming economy has also given rise to a new pet-serving industry worth billions of dollars. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.com


 

The notional value of reward points, half based on cell phone usage, is at least an annual $640 million, growing 10% to 20% a year.

China is new to this hunt. The U.S. has a well-established sector of so-called performance-improvement companies, some of which are 100 years old. They manage loyalty programs, employee-recognition awards and the like for corporate clients or provide software and support for these. Such fare–airline mileage points long being the currency of choice in the U.S.–are a $30-billion-a-year industry.

China is catching up on the reward program-based economy, which in a market like the U.S. is worth $30 billion a year. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.com

China is catching up on the reward program-based economy, which in a market like the U.S. is worth $30 billion a year. Click/Tap to read on Forbes.com

 


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